Master Facilitator Journal







I was talking with my friend Darin Harris this morning about the impact facilitation has on our personal and spiritual development. As we were talking, a metaphor came to mind about the facilitator being an instrument. While I've used the instrument metaphor before, today it showed me something deeper than in the past. In this week's article, Facilitating Ego Surrender, I share the metaphor then I'll talk about its ramifications.

Facilitating at a Distance coming December 7th
: Essentials of Teleclass & Virtual Meeting Facilitation. This class is for those of you wanting to offer a teleclass but don't feel you have all the skills and knowledge you need to do so, or for managers working with distributed teams that require you to facilitate virtual meetings. See details at the end of this issue.

Two New Blogs.
I recently started two new blogs. One is on the topic facilitation and allied disciplines at http://facilitatoru.com/blog. Please go there and sign up to receive updates and post your comments and questions. I also started a new blog on health and wellness with a close friend at http://integralongevity.com. We look forward to your comments, questions, and postings there as well.

I'm now a serious LinkedIn Networker!
I'm finally jumping on the bandwagon and diving into the social networking craze. I'm beginning to see the value in it, focusing primarily on LinkedIn for business purposes. If you are a serious open networker and would like to connect, please click here to join my network. Also, if you feel so inclined to leave a recommendation based on my work with this ezine and/or FacilitatorU, I would very much appreciate that!

Blessings,

Steve

Founder, FacilitatorU.com


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facilitator questions
The Point


Facilitating Ego Surrender
You serve your group to the degree you release ego identification



Self-Management Skill


I was talking with my friend Darin Harris this morning about the impact facilitation has on our personal and spiritual development. As we were talking, a metaphor came to mind about the facilitator being an instrument. While I've used the instrument metaphor before, today it showed me something deeper than in the past. First let me share the metaphor then I'll talk about its ramifications.

I remember that in my previous career as an electrical engineer, one of the most common instruments we used in our work was an oscilloscope. This device has a display screen that shows the voltage and frequency, i.e. energy level and vibration, of any point in a circuit we choose to measure. When this instrument is properly calibrated, it unerringly provides a faithful reading of what is occurring in a system. The "view" this instrument provides is essential to the design, troubleshooting, or repair of any system.

And now for the metaphor. I see facilitators as instruments of group process. We are invited to insert ourselves into people systems to help improve their functioning. Because of our insights and experience in group process and human dynamics, we are able to provide a readout of what's going on in a system to the system. In order to do this effectively, there are certain attitudes and behaviors required of us. Let's have a look at these.


Application


You must remain effectively calibrated.
To be an effective instrument, you must to the degree possible, be healthy, energetic, centered, and free of judgments. This is of course a challenge for most of us. So the process of good physical self-care and the continuous discipline of releasing attachment to thoughts or outcomes helps us be the best instruments we can be. A balanced and clear instrument functions best.

You must report what you sense for the group's highest and best good.
Just as a good instrument shows us what we can't see on our own, you will likely notice behaviors that can impede or support a group that the group members themselves can't see or won't verbalize. Making these known to the group gives them the opportunity to do something about them.

You must be unconcerned with how you'll look.
An instrument faithfully reports what it sees and has no concern about being judged for its report. When you don't understand what is said, you ask for clarification? When you don't know where the group is going or what it's doing, you inquire about that too. You may at times appear the fool asking simple questions and persistently seeking clear answers. For surely anyone who truly understands something can clearly explain it to a six-year old.

You may at times become invisible and unnecessary. When a group is moving forward on its own and does not require guidance or instrumentation, you may fade a bit to the background. If your goal is to help a group become more self-directed, then this is a good sign. If you require the focus of the group's attention on you as its leader, this may be bad news for your ego.

Your role at times may be undervalued. At the end of an event that has been effectively facilitated, a group will have done most of its own work and come up with its own decisions. Participants may not realize that their success may have been largely due to your helping them set the stage and the context for success. Again, once an instrument is no longer needed, it is forgotten.

So how does a human come to terms with being forgotten for doing a good job? This is somewhat contrary to typical workplace rewards. But it is often common in the world of parenting, mentoring, and of course, facilitating. Being OK with this prospect requires a larger view of ones role in the world. A view that has you seeing yourself as part of something much larger than yourself. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this.



Action


I’m interested in hearing your perspectives on this and how this information might help you facilitate groups as either a leader or as a participant. I'd love to hear your comments on this perspective or experiences you have to share. Just reply to this email.


This Week's Offer

Facilitating at a Distance Teleclass...
The Essentials of Teleclass & Virtual Meeting Facilitation

Virtual Meetings

Have you considered offering a teleclass as a more efficient way to deliver training, enhance group learning and generate more income for your business? Or, are you working with a distributed team that requires you to design and facilitate virtual meetings?

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60 minutes each day.


This class covers all the elements of T/VM facilitation using a simple, well-organized, and proven approach. This course, that you can take from the comfort of your own home or office, is for facilitators, trainers, coaches, who want to design relevant, engaging, experiential workshops for groups using a simple, proven formula that's easy to apply to any workshop topic.

Learn how to design and run a T/VM that will maximize the use of your group's time and energy.

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