Master Facilitator Journal | Issue #0288, February 6, 2007 ....
 


Dear friends,

Its easy when were trying to present something new, particularly in a training environment, to be overwhelmed by all there is to know and say on the subject. In fact, I'm often asked by trainers, "How do I cover all the information I have to share in the limited time I have?" In this week's article, Dethroning the god of Content,
we explore how to put engaged learning ahead of content delivery.


Transforming Conflict in the Workplace.
This 5-day teleclass will help you remove the fear and uncertainty in working with conflict in groups and organizations. Led by a 25-year expert in the fields of facilitation and mediation, Harry Webne-Behrman. Class starts February 12th. See details at the end of this issue.



Warmest regards,

Steve Davis
Publisher and Founder of FacilitatorU.com


 
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The Point


Dethroning the god of content
Put engaged learning ahead of content delivery

Presenting Skill


Its easy when were trying to present something new, particularly in a training environment, to be overwhelmed by all there is to know and say on the subject. In fact, I'm often asked by trainers, "How do I cover all the information I have to share in the limited time I have?" I usually answer with something like, "Don't even try." That is, don't try to "cover" it all. The whole point of getting a group of people together in a room, whether it's a real or virtual room, is to build, draw, and mine the value of everyone being together, sharing their experience and real time insights together.

With the advent of the Internet and email, it's real easy to share information all across the planet online. So what I like to do is put everything I know down in writing and share that with my groups before the training. Then during the training event, I can devote that time to following the groups' interest and energy around the material that most interests them. I can also use the time to have the group "doing" something active or interactive that adds to their learning rather than asking them to passively receive data.

Running trainings this way is in some ways more challenging
for me as a facilitator in that no two trainings on the same subject are ever the same as each group brings their own experience, interests, and information to the party. Leaving room for us to interact on the material, new and fresh content relevant to this group is often "co-created" between me and my participants.

Finally, its OK to leave the audience wanting a little bit. Its better for them to leave hungry and curious rather than overwhelmed and confused!


Application

Suppose you have an hour to present all there is to know about conflict resolution? You just happen to be an expert on this. You have at least 10 key points you want to deliver, about 5 examples, and you can talk on this subject for 60 minutes nonstop with no problem. You are concerned about how to present this in the time allowed.

Try putting yourself in the seat of your participants. Then ask yourself, "Which two or three things on this subject youd like to leave with if you were one of them?" Deliver these points using your planned activities. Then pull additional details from your audience through questions and discussion. This approach assures that the audience leaves with the major points you want them to have, and it also allows them to generate and share additional details in accordance with their immediate needs. Rather than being overwhelmed with data they'll likely soon forget, they will instead leave feeling excited about what theyve learned and/or practiced!

Action
 

The next time you have something to present, try this. Limit your agenda to no more than three major points per hour. Focus on creating opportunities for your audience to demonstrate to you and each other that they do in fact understand the material. This change in perspective will do wonders for your presentation. Not to mention your audience attention span! Im interested in hearing what happened.  Just reply to this email to send me your comments.

Resource

How to Get Your Point Across in 30 Seconds or Less,
by Milo O. Frank

Get your listeners attention, keep their interest, and make your point--all in thirty seconds! Anyone can be more effective in 30 seconds than in 30 minutes or 3 hours. Milo Frank, America's foremost business communications consultant, teaches you how to zero in on one's listeners and economically make your point by showing you how to: 

* Focus your objectives
* Utilize the "hook" technique
* Use the secrets of TV and advertising writers
* Tell terrific anecdotes that make your point
* Shine in meetings, question-and-answer sessions, and more! 

Milo's proven techniques give you the edge that successful people share -- the art of communicating quickly, precisely and powerfully! 

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In the Spotlight


Transforming Conflict in the Workplace...

Would you be a more effective facilitator or leader with a more solid base of conflict resolution skills under your belt? 

All organizations and relationships encounter conflict. It's what we do with it that makes all the difference in the world.

February 12th - 16th, 2007 10:00 AM Pacific, 1:00 PM Eastern (NY Time)

Remove the fear and uncertainty in working with conflict in groups and organizations in this 5-day teleclass series: Transforming Conflict in the Workplace, led by a 25-year expert in the fields of facilitation and mediation, Harry Webne-Behrman.

o Did you know that everyone has a unique style and response to conflict? Knowing your styles and response is critical to effective conflict resolution.

o Do you feel comfortable modeling effective conflict resolution skills as a facilitator? This is one of the best ways to prevent conflict from escalating.

o Did you know that 80% of effective conflict management consists of effective interpersonal communication? Knowing how to facilitate this kind of communication is key to mining the positive energy of conflict.

o Do you know what it takes to establish conflict resolution and staff facilitation programs within organizations? This knowledge is in growing demand for facilitators, coaches, and consultants.

In this class you will learn conflict resolution skills for facilitative leaders by exploring and evaluating your own styles and personal responses conflict, learning and practicing conflict resolution strategies in the context of group facilitation, and exploring how you can implement conflict resolution and staff facilitation programs within organizations.

By the end of the 5 days, you will:

  • Know your own conflict resolution style and response to conflict.
  • Be able to employ effective conflict resolution strategies with any group.
  • Understand how to deal with impasse in groups.
  • Be able to recognize others conflict styles and responses.
  • Have more confidence in dealing with conflict in groups and organizations.
  • Know the keys to implementing conflict resolution and staff facilitation programs within organizations.
  • And much more..



Click here for further details and registration.


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