Master Facilitator Journal | Issue #0177, November 2, 2004 | 7,000 Subscribers...
 


Dear friends,

This week we look at the business of facilitation in an article by fellow facilitator and friend Bev Lutz entitled, "
How Facilitators Define Success." In this article, Bev explores the typical definitions of success that most of us have experienced at one time or another, as well as some more progressive alternative definitions. She also includes a Satisfied Facilitator Quiz at the end of the article based on research she has done looking at success among facilitators at large from a variety of perspectives.

Please note that Bev and her partner, Cheryl Kartes will be our guest at the next expert interview on November 18th at 1:00 PM EST, where we'll go into detail about marketing and pricing for facilitation. Please see details below.

Be sure to visit our new Facilitator's Forum to ask questions or make comments on various aspects of facilitation. We hope you'll use this forum to you advantage and please let us know what you think of it.


In this Issue:

Feature Article: How Facilitators Define Success

Facilitation Micro-Skills Tele-Seminar: The Business of Facilitation. Keys to marketing and pricing facilitation services and outcomes while living a balanced life

Resource:
Million Dollar Consulting: The Professional's Guide to Growing a Practice

Self-Guided Teleclasses and Intranet License: Find out how
to put facilitation training on your company Intranet.

If any of you have any interesting stories or experiences about facilitation, group process, work groups, team building, training, etc. that might interest our readers, please send them to us.

Have a great week!

Steve Davis
Publisher

 
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170 articles and growing
d
Self-Facilitation Skill

How Facilitators Define Success
Unraveling the distinction between a good life and a good living

The Point

Pictures of Success

I remember the old photo of Carl Icahn, (a corporate raider now worth about 5.8 billion dollars who, according to Forbes, prefers the title “shareholder activist”). It was the 90’s and Icahn was sitting against a backdrop of sculptured wood paneling, in an opulent leather chair, on a flawless natural wood floor, with an alert German Shepherd positioned by his side.

This was a picture of wealth, power, control and intelligence. A place for everything and everything in its place. All that and, as a friend noticed, the dog, walls, floor and chair all matched! A picture of success.

Nowadays, we might see a teen-age web-wizard in baggy pants, a baseball cap and sporting a ferret on one shoulder. Nothing would match – or even fit -- but it would still be a picture of success.

Titles, the Age Wage, and Moving UP!

As I dwell on these images, my thoughts go back, way back, to some of my own definitions and misconceptions of success. One of our family jokes involved me at the savvy age of five one day learning that my father had been promoted to an Assistant Vice President for his company.

That evening I grandly strutted about our living room announcing to guests that my father was a success; he wasn’t just a Vice President, he was an Assistant Vice President! You see, I knew the more words in the title, the more successful you must be.

In my twenties, the 70’s, there was the Age Wage. Some of you may remember. You were not successful unless your income was your current age times one thousand dollars. By the time I was thirty I making my age wage! Success at last! And it’s interesting, though I ‘knew” I was successful because I met the measure, I didn’t really feel that successful. My “success” is now adjusted for inflation and I’m even less excited.

Later in my life success changed again. When people asked, “In ten years, where would you want to be?” I answered, not President (especially this year!) or queen, but “Corporate Staff Vice President, right hand to the CEO.” Friends told me I was an underachiever; I thought of it as the power behind the throne.

I had the aspiration, but not the conviction that I’d ever make it. I don’t think it was because I thought women couldn’t get here or that I wasn’t smart enough. I think that at some level I wasn’t really sure I wanted it badly enough – I wasn’t hungry enough.

You see, you have to be motivated for success, however you define it. And define it you better, because if you don’t, other people will attempt to define it for you.

How Do You Define Success?

How did your family, school, organization, friends, TV, and magazines define success for you when you were growing up? Did you have to be perfect and pleasing? The quiet Honor Roll member? A sports hero/heroine, dance line leader or Student Body President? Theatrical? Popular? Whatever that meant!

And how do you define it now?

How many of you believe, at some level, that successful people are those people who do more. Do you find yourselves thinking, “I’m not doing enough. I’d be more successful if I could just do more.” And then, when you’re feeling pretty satisfied with how much you just did, you turn around to see someone who is doing even more?

And how many of us still feel that if we’re going to successful we have to be moving “up”? Up the hierarchy in the organization; up the income levels; up in the neighborhood; up, up, up. It can be a tall ladder and I’d always been afraid of heights, so I wasn’t really sure “up” was the right way for me.

And how many find that following a calling, answering our mind’s urgings with our spirit’s beckoning is key? Creating, serving, changing the world, one group at a time.

Another Approach to Success – Start with the Good Life

When one of my coaching clients tells me they need to make $80,000 or $120,000/year, I say, “Please, hold that thought.” Then I ask, “What life do you want to live? How do you define a “good life?” And then, “What living would support that life?” And that answer I’ve dubbed the Sage Wage. And you might be surprised how much lower that figure is than the one they started with.

Mind you, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to earn wonderfully large heaps and gobs of money! Everyone should aspire to be a Fairy Godmother, run a Foundation of their own, and live richly in any way they define it! And, I do have a strong bias that money cannot buy satisfaction, even though it can certainly ease the challenges one faces.

Application

The Satisfied Facilitator Quiz

What’s your definition of success? What motivates you? What calling are you answering?

And what would we see if we looked at other facilitators in their natural habitat? What picture of success would greet our eyes? Designer markers from Neuland or the Grove? Post-it pads? Our suitcase on wheels filled with facilitator toys ready to roll off to the next job? Our office walls plastered in paper covered with bulleted lists, planning maps and star people? Working locally or traveling globally? And are we in suits? Flowing skirts? Tribal dress? Our PJs?

Take this simple Satisfied Facilitator Quiz and discover for yourself.

Which facilitator below rates satisfaction with life, work, and work/life balance at least a 9 on a ten-point scale?

a) Solo practitioner in business for 10-15 years, works 30-40 hours/week, earns $100,000 to $150,000/year, spends 10-15 days/year on professional development and takes over 25 days/year off for renewal.

b) Employee for 15-20 years, works 30-40 hours/week, earns less than $25,000/year, spends 15-20 days on professional development and takes 20-25 days/year off for renewal.

c) Solo practitioner in business for less than a year, working less than ten hours/week, earning less than $25,000/year, spends 10-15 days/year on professional development and takes more than 25 days/year off for renewal.

d) Solo practitioner in business for 15-20 years, works 50-60 hours/week, earns $200,000-250,000/year, spends 20-25 days/year on professional development and takes more than 25 days/year off for renewal.

What answer did you choose?

If your definition of satisfaction or success includes something about money – how much someone earns, for instance -- you might have chosen “d”.

If success is autonomy, running your own show – having your own business -- then you’d have chosen a, c, or d.
·
If success has a component of aligning with an organization or even the possible security associated with being an employee, “b” might have appealed to you.

If success means spending more time learning and renewing than working, then you’d probably have chosen “c”.

If success is more of a balance between income, professional development, renewal and time spent, then you’d have a lot to choose from.

If you answered, “All of the above!” you’d be correct. All of these facilitators rated the three aspects – life, work and work/life balance – at a nine or ten.

What Our Surveys Show

I’ve been co-facilitating the Business of Facilitation classes for about five years now – most recently with my colleague and friend, Cheryl Kartes of Kartes and Associates. During those five years we’ve surveyed increasingly larger number of facilitators about their life and their living.

And we’ve found that Facilitators have as many different versions of the good life and the good living as you could imagine. Some of them include:

  • Working for the U.N. for a daily rate of less than $800 US.
  • Working with CEOs on vision, values and mission for thousands of dollars a day.
  • Facilitating 100% of their work time.
  • Or balancing a facilitation practice with coaching, public speaking, training, and consulting

What our participants tell us is that regardless of the income, the title, or the clients, they feel good about their work – in fact, they feel really good about it! Facilitation seems to feed the spirit in ways other professions don’t. It’s work that nourishes both the good living and the good life.

For more on the Facilitator Survey and the Business of Facilitation join Steve Davis, Bev Lutz and Cheryl Kartes November 18th for a one-hour interview on the subject. See details below.

About the Author:
Bev Lutz, MCC, MBA, CPCC is the cofounder of three businesses: The Legacy Center: preserving stories, values and meaning; Lighthouse Group and Associates; and the new -- Two Heads are Better(tm) - helping bright people with just-in-time unsticking when their natural creativity is stuck, and a Master Certified Coach. She can be reached at LghtHseGrp@aol.com.

Action


Spend a few minutes this week to ask yourself how you define success in your professional and personal life.. Let us know what you come up with.

Facilitation Expert Series


The Business of Facilitation

Keys to marketing and pricing facilitation services and outcomes while living a balanced life


Featuring Bev Lutz and Cheryl Kartes, Facilitators,
Trainers, and Consultants


"Just in Time" Learning

Attend this one-hour tele-seminar with Bev Lutz, Cheryl Kartes, and Steve Davis and learn keys to marketing and pricing facilitation services, tips on selling outcomes versus activities, and ways to make a good life and a good living. Join us on Thursday, November 18th at 1:00 PM EST (NY Time) where we'll explore some of the following specific points...

What it takes for a Facilitator to be successful in private practice.
The 3 keys for successfully marketing Facilitation?
The typical angles facilitators employ in their marketing.
The 8 biggest mistakes Facilitators make in trying to sell themselves.
8 tips on the pricing of facilitation services.
"Value-Based Pricing" and how it differs from typical pricing strategies.
Ways facilitators can use to form strategic alliances to increase their chances of success.
And, answers to any questions you bring to the teleclass.

Three Free Bonuses!

1.Benchmarks of Facilitator Success. Article by Cheryl Kartes that speaks to expanded definitions of success and includes summarized results of a survey conducted with 116 facilitators looking at their practices in terms of variables such as income, hourly rates, leisure time, work hours, professional training, satisfaction, work/life balance, etc..

2. Business of Facilitation Survey. View the results of the survey mentioned above--answers to 15 questions asked by Bev and Cheryl's of 116 facilitators about their business and lifestyle, including 97 ideas they provided for improving their ratings.

3.Strategic Marketing For Professionals ($15 value). This collection of five articles provides an overview of marketing for professionals who provides intangible services. These articles offer ideas that help you design the strategy for your business. Use them to lay a foundation for your marketing effort, to provide an infusion of ideas and energy, or to get a few new hints that will provide a big payoff.


About Bev and Cheryl.

Bev Lutz, MCC, MBA, CPCC is the cofounder of three businesses: The Legacy Center: preserving stories, values and meaning; Lighthouse Group and Associates; and the new -- Two Heads are Better(tm) - helping bright people with just-in-time unsticking when their natural creativity is stuck. A Master Certified Coach, member of the International Association of Facilitators, the International Coach Federation, former steering committee member of the Minnesota Facilitators Network, and volunteer for the Peace Foundation, Bev also co-leads the Professional Development Team of the Minnesota Coaches Association. She's been privileged to co-facilitate sessions of The Business of Facilitation at four international conferences and several local showcases. And she's grateful for the wisdom and growth garnered from relationships with organizations such as Honeywell, the American Academy of Neurologists, Kroll/Ontrack, ACA International, numerous impassioned individuals and four very wise cats.

Cheryl Kartes, through Kartes & Associates provides facilitation, graphic recording, consulting, training, and mediation services. She has specialized in the human side of teamwork, using creative, participatory and experiential methods. Clients include nonprofit, government and business sectors, locally and nationally. Since 1994, she has been associated with the Institute of Cultural Affairs as a trainer of Technology of Participation® courses, currently as a "mentor" trainer. Kartes is a co-founding member of the Minnesota Facilitators Network and was co-chair, IAF Conference 2001 Minnesota.

Click here for details about this interview, the bonuses, and registration.

Resource


Million Dollar Consulting: The Professional's Guide to Growing a Practice, by Alan Weiss

I have been consuling for 10 years. About 4 years ago I stumbled across this book. I bought it principally because I was going on a trip and needed something to read, I had no expectations. I was surprised to find a wealth of advise that I really needed to bring my consulting to the next level. Issues such as: Setting value based fees, building relationships, dropping the lower end of the business to make room for bigger opportunities and importance of self promotion through publishing & speaking.
The other thing I enjoyed is that Alan presents consulting as an honorable trade that can really help effect change and growth for our customers. If your a consultant, you should read this book! At a minimum your guaranteed to find a few useful points. --Chris P. Kunicki, Chanhassen, MN, USA--

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