Master Facilitator Journal | Issue #0166| August 17, 2004 | 8,000 Subscribers...
 
Dear friends,

I attended a seminar this weekend
in Boulder with noted author, psychiatrist, and professor, Roger Walsh on Awakening Service (Karma Yoga) and Ethics sponsored by the Integral Institute. I particularly enjoyed a simple eight-step process one can use to approach life in a more awakened fashion. It occurs to me that this practice would be ideal for facilitators preparing to approach their work with groups so I wanted to share it with you this week. I hope you find this perspective useful, and as always, I look forward to your feedback.

Have a great week!

Steve Davis
Publisher


 
Self-Mastery Skill

Awakening Service as a Facilitator

Nine steps to transforming your outer work through inner work.


The Point


Facilitating a group is one of the highest forms of service one can provide. Preparing yourself to do this work before it happens however, can be overlooked in light of all that goes into preparing content and processes. Spending just a few minutes prior to going into a group to clarify your intent, motivations, and how you'll deal internally with what comes up can truly transform your experience in a positive way. Practicing the process of awakening service in your facilitation may afford you the following benefits:

  • Transforms your work into the opportunity for learning and awakening.
  • Reduces negative emotions such as anxiety, worry, and depression.
  • Increases satisfaction and happiness.
  • Reduces burnout.
  • Reduces power games.
  • Reduces possibility of being manipulated. You can only be manipulated if you're attached. You can only be of help to people to the degree you don't need anything from them.
  • Increases flow and effectiveness.

Application


Borrowing from the nine steps of Karma Yoga or Awakening Service, try preparing yourself using these steps the next time you plan to facilitate or attend a group.

Nine Steps to Awakening Service.

1. Stop. Interrupt your normal automatic process and turn your awareness inward.

2.
Reflect. What is the purpose of the work you're about to do? What's going on inside of you right now? Can you simply be with it?

3. Dedicate activity to a higher goal.
Set an intention for how you'd like to be with this group. How would you like to show up? What qualities and philosophies will guide your actions?

4. Attempt to act impeccably. Once you're in the room, remember your intention and do your best to let it guide your actions.

5. Be Mindful. Notice what's going on, both inside and outside of you.

6. Work with what comes up. Simply be OK with whatever shows up in your groups. Bringing your best awareness, intentions, processes, and actions to your group is all you can do.

7. Reduce addictions to how you think things should turn out. Surrender your attachment to things turning out a certain way.

8. Reflect and learn. Explore your actions and feedback, both internal and external and make adjustments as necessary.

9. Offer benefits to others. Seek to offer what you've learned in a spirit of service as you incorporate these lessons into your future work.


Action


Employ the nine steps above to the next group you plan to attend or facilitate, or to any other activity you've got going on in your life. Please
send us your questions and comments.


Resource

Essential Spirituality : The 7 Central Practices to Awaken Heart and Mind,
by Roger Walsh

Psychiatrist and philosopher Roger Walsh looks at seven common practices of the world's major religions to tease out a guidebook for contemporary spirituality. With gleanings from Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism, Walsh offers seven chapters devoted to enlightenment. For example, "Practice 1" discusses how readers can reduce cravings and find the soul's desire (very relevant in an increasingly materialistic world). Once Walsh has laid out the goals and reasoning behind each practice, he offers an array of exercises, such as how to "Examine the Experience of Craving" or "Reflect on the Cost of Craving." Although this format is overtly self-help, Walsh has brought forth a wise and highly respectable book that integrates some of the best practices that the world's religions can offer. The introduction by the Dalai Lama gives Walsh great praise for helping readers become purer in motivation so that they can lead a more fulfilling life in service to love and compassion. --Gail Hudson --


In the Spotlight

The Mindful Facilitator...

Cultivating Professional Presence Through Mindfulness

Featuring Doug Silsbee,
Executive Coach, Consultant, and Author


"Just in Time" Learning

Doug Silsbee is a master teacher and author of The Mindful Coach: Seven Roles for Helping People Grow. In this interview, we'll emphasize practical strategies for recognizing and working with the attachments that pull us away from being fully present and in service to our groups. Access this pre-recorded one-hour teleseminar with Doug Silsbee and Steve Davis. Some of the points discussed are...

What does mindfulness mean to me as a facilitator?
What mental habits create conflicts of interest?
How do mental habits subvert the work that I do?
How does professional presence benefit me as a facilitator/coach?
How does my professional presence benefit my clients?
How can I recognize when I'm attached, or in the grip of a habit?
What practical tools can help me name and work with the habits that pull us off center?
How can I integrate mindfulness into our own professional development?
And, answers to any questions you bring to the teleclass.

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Using Creative Feedback Strategies to Develop Self-Correcting Employees explores a number of unusual ways to provide feedback, with the goal of encouraging your people to become more self-correcting.

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If, for any reason, you are not satisfied with this teleclass, simply email us with a request to refund/credit your credit card in the full amount and we will do so immediately. It's our policy to do this and we honor this in every single case.

About Doug. Doug Silsbee is an executive coach, consultant, and author in Asheville, NC. A master teacher, he has worked with leaders in major corporations, non-profits, small business and government in eleven countries on four continents. He specializes in designing integrated development programs for high-performing executives, managers, and entrepreneurs. A leader in the coaching field, Doug is certified as an Integral Coach by New Ventures West, and as a Professional Certified Coach by the International Coach Federation. He is the author of the well-received 2004 book, The Mindful Coach: Seven Roles for Helping People Grow.



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